Mark Nichol: What the Hell Do You Do About Profanity?

fun with profanity filters

fun with profanity filters (Photo credit: skampy)

 

What place, if any, does profanity have in writing? There are as many different answers as there are types of writing.

 

Fiction

 

Novels that purport to reflect real life must include profanity if the life they reflect includes use of profanity. This is difficult to accept for many people of a certain age, dismayed by the ubiquity of swearwords in modern literature, who have the disadvantage of having grown up during an era when books and movies were censored. (But let’s get real: In the Old West, cantankerous cowboys did not refer to each other as “You no-good so-and-so,” and in combat, to paraphrase a well-known expression, there are no decorous speakers in foxholes.) Popular entertainment often admittedly goes overboard in drenching dialogue in profanity, but that is merely an exaggeration, not a fabrication, of reality.

 

Continue reading on DailyWritingTips…

 

Advertisements

Nidhi Thakur: #Is that really you?

Brunch

Brunch (Photo credit: shareski)

It is really ironic that the moment I read this topic in  Brunch, I didn’t turn to the 50 people sitting around me at work. Instead, I logged onto my Twitter account and posted a tweet asking a bunch of strangers for their valuable inputs and bounced ideas and theories off them. What is funny is that discussing it with people didn’t even occur to me. Also, before posting the tweet, I didn’t spend a second to decide whether I agreed with the viewpoint or not. But the response I received just endorsed my subconscious decision.

Today we live in an age where a city-wide distance from our loved ones doesn’t hurt us as much as the detachment we feel when we charge our phone and it’s inaccessible. So important has virtual acceptance become, that we do not realise how and when it takes over our real existence.

Continue reading on Brunch…

CHARLES L. GRISWOLD: Forgiveness

On Forgiveness

By CHARLES L. GRISWOLD

We are in a season traditionally devoted to good will among people and to the renewal of hope in the face of hard times.  As we seek to realize these lofty ideals, one of our greatest challenges is overcoming bitterness and divisiveness.  We all struggle with the wrongs others have done to us as well as those we have done to others, and we recoil at the vast extent of injury humankind seems determined to inflict on itself.  How to keep hope alive?  Without a constructive answer to toxic anger, addictive cycles of revenge, and immobilizing guilt, we seem doomed to despair about chances for renewal.  One answer to this despair lies in forgiveness.

What is forgiveness? When is it appropriate? Why is it considered to be commendable?  Some claim that forgiveness is merely about ridding oneself of vengeful anger; do that, and you have forgiven.  But if you were able to banish anger from your soul simply by taking a pill, would the result really be forgiveness?  The timing of forgiveness is also disputed. Some say that it should wait for the offender to take responsibility and suffer due punishment, others hold that the victim must first overcome anger altogether, and still others that forgiveness should be unilaterally bestowed at the earliest possible moment.  But what if you have every good reason to be angry and even to take your sweet revenge as well?  Is forgiveness then really to be commended? Some object that it lets the offender off the hook, confesses to one’s own weakness and vulnerability, and papers over the legitimate demands of vengeful anger.  And yet, legions praise forgiveness and think of it as an indispensable virtue.  Recall the title of Archbishop Desmond Tutu’s book on the subject: “No Future Without Forgiveness.”

Read more here>>>>

Unknown: Battle between two wolves

The Three Cherokee. Came over from the head of...

Image via Wikipedia

One evening an old Cherokee told his grandson about a battle that was going on inside himself. He said, “My son, it is between two wolves. One is evil: anger, envy,sorrow,regret, greed, arrogance, self-pity,guilt,resentment,inferiority,lies, false pride,superiority,and ego. The other is good: joy, peace,love, hope,serenity,humility,kindness,benevolence,empathy,generosity,truth, compassion,and faith.”

The grandson thought about it for a minute and then asked his grandfather,”Which wolf wins?” The old Cherokee simply replied, “The one I feed.”

—Author Unknown

The Excremental

Sigmund Freud was an Austrian neurologist and ...

Image via Wikipedia

The excremental is all too intimately and inseparably bound up with the sexual: the position of the genitals—inter urinas et faeces—remains the decisive and unchangeable factor. One might say here, varying a well-known saying of the great Napoleon: "Anatomy is destiny."

Sigmund Freud (1856–1939), Austrian psychiatrist. repr. in Complete Works, Standard Edition, vol. 11, eds. James Strachey and Anna Freud (1957). On the Universal Tendency to Debasement in the Sphere of Love, sect. 3 (1912).
Napoleon had said, "Politics is destiny" (as reported by German poet Goethe in conversation with him in 1808).