German Proverb: Anger

“Anger without power is folly.”

German Proverb


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William Blake: A Poison Tree

The artist and poet William Blake, who lived i...

The artist and poet William Blake, who lived in Hercules Road — a portrait by Thomas Phillips (1807). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A Poison Tree

I was angry with my friend:
I told my wrath, my wrath did end.
I was angry with my foe:
I told it not, my wrath did grow.

And I water’d it in fears,
Night & morning with my tears;
And I summoned it with smiles,
And with soft deceitful wiles.

And it grew both day and night,
Till it bore an apple bright;
And my foe beheld it shine,
And he knew that it was mine,

And into my garden stole
When the night had veil’d the pole:
In the morning glad I see
My foe outstretch’d beneath the tree.

William Blake (1757-1827)

Jacqueline Schiff: Short temper,long walk

Kenza Braiga Temper 7

Kenza Braiga Temper 7 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The best remedy for a short temper is a long walk.
—Jacqueline Schiff

CHARLES L. GRISWOLD: Forgiveness

On Forgiveness

By CHARLES L. GRISWOLD

We are in a season traditionally devoted to good will among people and to the renewal of hope in the face of hard times.  As we seek to realize these lofty ideals, one of our greatest challenges is overcoming bitterness and divisiveness.  We all struggle with the wrongs others have done to us as well as those we have done to others, and we recoil at the vast extent of injury humankind seems determined to inflict on itself.  How to keep hope alive?  Without a constructive answer to toxic anger, addictive cycles of revenge, and immobilizing guilt, we seem doomed to despair about chances for renewal.  One answer to this despair lies in forgiveness.

What is forgiveness? When is it appropriate? Why is it considered to be commendable?  Some claim that forgiveness is merely about ridding oneself of vengeful anger; do that, and you have forgiven.  But if you were able to banish anger from your soul simply by taking a pill, would the result really be forgiveness?  The timing of forgiveness is also disputed. Some say that it should wait for the offender to take responsibility and suffer due punishment, others hold that the victim must first overcome anger altogether, and still others that forgiveness should be unilaterally bestowed at the earliest possible moment.  But what if you have every good reason to be angry and even to take your sweet revenge as well?  Is forgiveness then really to be commended? Some object that it lets the offender off the hook, confesses to one’s own weakness and vulnerability, and papers over the legitimate demands of vengeful anger.  And yet, legions praise forgiveness and think of it as an indispensable virtue.  Recall the title of Archbishop Desmond Tutu’s book on the subject: “No Future Without Forgiveness.”

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H.G. Wells: Bend a little

H.G. Wells' The War of the Worlds (2005 film)

Image via Wikipedia

“Let your love be stronger than your hate or anger. Learn the wisdom of compromise, for it is better to bend a little than to break.” ~H.G. Wells, quoted in “Happily Ever After.”

Louis L’amour: Anger

Anger Management

Image via Wikipedia

Anger is a killing thing; kills the man who angers,

For each rage leaves him less than he had been

Before it takes something from HIM.

– LOUIS L’AMOUR.