Confucius: Forgiveness

Those who cannot forgive others break the bridge over which they themselves must pass. -Confucius, philosopher and teacher (c. 551-478 BCE)

Engraving of Confucius. The Chinese characters...

Engraving of Confucius. The Chinese characters read “Portrait of the First Teacher, Confucius, Giving a Lecture”. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Superior man

A superior man is modest in his speech, but exceeds in his actions. -Confucius, philosopher and teacher (c. 551-478 BCE)

Lucius Annaeus Seneca: Treating mankind

A physician is not angry at the intemperance of a mad patient; nor does he take it ill to be railed at by a man in a fever. Just so should a wise man treat all mankind, as a physician does his patient; and looking upon them only as sick and extravagant. -Lucius Annaeus Seneca, philosopher (BCE 3-65 CE)

Aristotle: Philosophy

I have gained this by philosophy: that I do without being commanded what others do only from fear of the law. –Aristotle, philosopher (384-322 BCE)

Portrait of Aristoteles. Pentelic marble, copy...

Portrait of Aristoteles. Pentelic marble, copy of the Imperial Period (1st or 2nd century) of a lost bronze sculpture made by Lysippos. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Diogenes: Superiors’ fire

A man should live with his superiors as he does with his fire: not too near, lest he burn; nor too far off, lest he freeze. -Diogenes, philosopher (412?-323 BCE)

English: Portrait of Hellenic philosopher Diog...

English: Portrait of Hellenic philosopher Diogenes Babylonicus (Diogenes of Babylon / Diogenes the Stoic) Διογένης (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Marcus Tullius Cicero: Extreme justice and injustice

 

Marcus Tullius Cicero, Roman Consul, 106-43 BC...

Marcus Tullius Cicero, Roman Consul, 106-43 BC, Marble bust from Florence (Italy), XVIIe century, Château de Vaux-le-Vicomte, France (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Extreme justice is extreme injustice. –Marcus Tullius Cicero, statesman, orator, writer (106-43 BCE)

 

 

Xenophanes: Gods resemble themselves

Bust of Xenophanes.

Image via Wikipedia

Ethiopians imagine their gods as black and snub-nosed; Thracians blue-eyed and red-haired. But if horses or lions had hands, or could draw and fashion works as men do, horses would draw the gods shaped like horses and lions like lions, making the gods resemble themselves. –Xenophanes, philosopher and poet (c.570-475 BCE)