Rick Warren's Eight Principles For Managing Stress

Pastor Rick Warren at Saddleback Church.

Pastor Rick Warren at Saddleback Church. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Rick Warren’s Eight Principles For Managing Stress

  1. Principle of Identification.

    Know who you are.

  2. Principle of Belonging.

Know whom you’re trying to please. You cannot please everybody because if you please one group you displease another.

  1. Principle of Accomplishment.

Know what you’re trying to accomplish.

Either live by priorities or by pressures. There is no other option.

  1. Principle of Concentration.

Focus on one thing at a time.

  1. Principle of Delegation.

Don’t try to do it all yourself.

  1. Principle of Meditation.

Make a habit of personal prayer.

Prayer is a gigantic stress-reliever.

  1. Principle of Relaxation and Recreation.

Take time to enjoy life.

  1. Principle of God.

Give your stress to Christ.

Source: God’s Answers to Life’s Difficult Questions by Rick Warren.

Bill Hybels: Cross, not a crown

Stained glass at St John the Baptist's Anglica...

Stained glass at St John the Baptist’s Anglican Church http://www.stjohnsashfield.org.au, Ashfield, New South Wales. Illustrates Jesus’ description of himself “I am the Good Shepherd” (from the Gospel of John, chapter 10, verse 11). This version of the image shows the detail of his face. The memorial window is also captioned: “To the Glory of God and in Loving Memory of William Wright. Died 6th November, 1932. Aged 70 Yrs.” (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

God led Jesus to a cross, not a crown, and yet that cross ultimately proved to be the gateway to freedom and forgiveness for every sinner in the world. God also asks us as Jesus’ followers to carry a cross. Paradoxically, in carrying that cross, we find liberty and joy and fulfillment.

Bill Hybels
WillowCreekCommunityChurch

Pope Benedict XVI: Christianity

English: Pope Benedict XVI during general audition

English: Pope Benedict XVI during general audition (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

“Many people perceive Christianity as something institutional — rather than as an encounter with Christ — which explains why they don’t see it as a source of joy.”
Pope Benedict XVI, May 2004

 

Origen Adamantius: Jesus and the multitudes

Stained glass at St John the Baptist's Anglica...

Stained glass at St John the Baptist’s Anglican Church http://www.stjohnsashfield.org.au, Ashfield, New South Wales. Illustrates Jesus’ description of himself “I am the Good Shepherd” (from the Gospel of John, chapter 10, verse 11). This version of the image shows the detail of his face. The memorial window is also captioned: “To the Glory of God and in Loving Memory of William Wright. Died 6th November, 1932. Aged 70 Yrs.” (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“When Jesus then is with the multitudes, He is not in His house, for the multitudes are outside of the house, and it is an act which springs from His love of men to leave the house and to go away to those who are not able to come to Him. ”
Origen Adamantius

Bob Wilkin: Most fortunate

English: Icon of Jesus Christ

English: Icon of Jesus Christ (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

“Because of Christ‘s resurrection–and His guarantee that He will resurrect all who believe in Him–we are the most fortunate, the most blest people on the planet Our faith is effective, we are not in our sins, our departed loved ones are with the Lord, and the labor we do for Him is not in vain.”
Bob Wilkin

 

Pope Benedict XVI: Lent

“The observance of Lent is the very badge of Christian warfare. By it we prove ourselves not to be enemies of the cross of Christ. By it we avert the scourges of divine justice. By it we gain strength against the princes of darkness, for it shields us with heavenly help. Should mankind grow remiss in their observance of Lent, it would be a detriment to God’s glory, a disgrace to the Catholic religion, and a danger to Christian souls. Neither can it be doubted that such negligence would become the source of misery to the world, of public calamity, and of private woe.” –Pope Benedict XVI

 

 

Pope Benedictus XVI

Pope Benedictus XVI (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Martin Luther: Obedience

Martin Luther, commemorated on February 18 Eva...

Martin Luther, commemorated on February 18 Evangelical Lutheran Worship. Minneapolis: Fortress Press (2006), 15. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

There is no justification without sanctification, no forgiveness without renewal of life, no real faith from which the fruits of

 

new obedience do not grow.

 

Martin Luther

 

Bible: Work of righteousness

 

“And the work of righteousness shall be peace and the effect of righteousness quietness and assurance for ever.”
Bible

 

 

Ephesians Bible: Wherefore…

Illuminated Manuscript, The Rochester Bible, W...

Illuminated Manuscript, The Rochester Bible, Walters Art Museum Ms. W.18, fol.199r (Photo credit: Walters Art Museum Illuminated Manuscripts)

“Wherefore putting away lying, speak every man truth with his neighbour for we are members one of another.”
Ephesians Bible

Rembrandt and Leadership

The Head of Christ painting by Warner Sallman,...

The Head of Christ painting by Warner Sallman, 1941. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In addition to being a great painting, Rembrandt’s “Head of Christ,” reveals two traits that great leaders and great artists share: the willingness to persist past the initial round of success and failure in life, and the courage to find a true mission and serve it.

Rembrandt painted the “Head of Christ” in about 1649, in the middle of the most prolific and also the most brutal period of his life. From 1635 to 1660, he endured the death of his wife and three sons, and a long slow descent from wealth to poverty. But as his sufferings became greater, so did his paintings. The works of Rembrandt’s final quarter century, made in terrible adversity, are universally considered the best of his career.

Rembrandt’s genius came only with maturity. It was not until he was in his late 30s that he even started painting in a style different from his peers. He had long been known as the most technically skilled painter of his generation, but it was only after being seasoned by success and (perhaps more important) failure that his full talent emerged. When he painted the “Head of Christ,” Rembrandt was forty-three, already an old man by the standards of the 1600s. Had he allowed himself to coast on his previous success, or be crippled by his private suffering, he would never have had the chance to do his best work.

Like great artists, great leaders change and mature over time. As students of leadership, we find that the most powerful lessons come from mature leaders. They have learned how to cope with both failure and success. Their experience with employees is long and deep. And they have at some point understood that no leader emerges from youth with a perfect record.

The “Head of Christ” embodies another quality great leaders and great artists share: authenticity. Rather than depict Jesus with an idealized northern European face, as his contemporaries did, Rembrandt found a young Sephardic Jew from an Amsterdam ghetto and used him as a model.

Truly effective leadership is built on this kind of authenticity. If you strive only for commercial success, you are not striving for enough. In fact, you are probably holding yourself back.

Cicero: Higher humility

Marcus Tullius Cicero, after whom Teuffel name...

Marcus Tullius Cicero, after whom Teuffel named his Ciceronian period of the Golden Age. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“The higher we are placed, the more humbly we should walk. ”

Cicero

Never wrong…

Lost Wisdom

Lost Wisdom (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“A person determined never to be wrong won’t likely accomplish much.”

—Ken Wisdom

Faith and discipline

Italian American

“It’s easy to have faith in yourself and have discipline when you’re a winner, when you’re number one. What you got to have is faith and discipline when you’re not a winner.”

Vince Lombardi

Tyron Edwards: Happiness

Bring Back My Happiness

Bring Back My Happiness (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“Happiness is like manna; it is to be gathered in grains, and enjoyed every day. It will not keep; it cannot be accumulated; nor have we got to go out of ourselves or into remote places to gather it, since it has rained down from a Heaven, at our very door.”
Tyron Edwards

William Ralph Inge: Christianity

Symbol of Christianity, white and golden version.

Symbol of Christianity, white and golden version. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Christmas ball - Christianity“No Christian can be a pessimist, for Christianity is a system of radical optimism. ”
William Ralph Inge.

Christianity.com

Christianity.com (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Herman Hesse: Love of God and good

Hermann Hesse, photographed this year

Love of God is not always the same as love of good. ”
Herman Hesse.